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Hamilton Grange National Monument

VISITOR INFORMATION

LOCATION

414 West 141st St. (St Nicholas Park), Manhattan.

GETTING THERE

Get map & directions.

HOURS

Visitor Center open Wednesday-Sunday, 9am-5pm.

ACCESSIBILITY

The Visitor Center and period rooms are wheelchair accessible.

PETS

Are pets allowed?

CONTACT

Hamilton Grange National Monument (NPS), 212-283-5154.

NEARBY ATTRACTIONS

General Grant Memorial
Riverside Park

National Park Service

Hamilton Grange National Monument

The tomb of our 18th President and an Outlook Pavilion in Morningside Heights on the Hudson



Hamilton Grange or the Grange as it is affectionately known is the former home of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton. Closed for renovations in 2008, the Grange was moved to its new location in St. Nicholas Park and reopened to the public in September 2011. This move was the second for the house, which was first moved in 1889 after the Hamilton family sold the estate. Called a "handsome restoration" by The New York Times, the Grange restored to its former glory, including the reconstruction of porches long detached now gives visitors a clearer understanding of the regal country home of one the nation's most important statesmen.

A freshly constructed visitor center at the ground level includes a small theatre, exhibits and a bookstore and above, visitors are able to explore the original house restored to look as it did during Hamilton's time. National park rangers give tours and host special programs illuminating Hamilton's life and contribution to the birth of the nation. Visitors are also encouraged to linger in the landscaped gardens surrounding the home.

Steve Laise

Listen to the engrossing story by NPS historian Steve Laise of Hamilton's unlikely rise from humble beginnings on the island of Nevis in the Caribbean to Washington's right-hand man and, ultimately, first Secretary of the Treasury.

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Born in the West Indies without wealth or status, Alexander Hamilton became one of the most powerful men in America. As a teenager, he ventured to New York City to attend Kings College (now Columbia University), and was quickly swept up in the passions of the Revolution. As a primary creator of the Federalist Papers, Hamilton's writing contributed to the development of political parties and the emergence of the nation's strong central government. Alexander Hamilton joined President Washington's cabinet as the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury in 1789. In this role, he created the financial foundation of the United States by forming the national bank and establishing the financial integrity of the young nation. After leaving public office, Hamilton continued to support the Federalist Party and also continued his intense political rivalry with Aaron Burr. Their hostilities ultimately led to the infamous duel between the two men in 1804 which killed Hamilton.

Completed in 1802, Hamilton Grange originally stood a short distance northwest of its present location. It was designed by John McComb, Jr., known more famously as one of the designers of New York's City Hall. Named the Grange after Hamilton's ancestral home in Scotland, the house became a symbol of the affluence and dignity which Hamilton sought throughout his life. It was the only home he ever owned and is a very early example of domestic Federal style architecture. It features an octagonal parlor and dining room as well as an unusual mirrored interior.

Things to Do

Special Events in February

These events are offered on a first-come, first-served basis for a maximum of 25 people. Call 646-548-2310 for details.

Blacks in Green and Gray

2/1 & 2/15, 2:30-3:30pm

Learn about the Army's "Buffalo Soldiers," African American troops protecting our parks before the National Park Service was established, and discover their crucial role in events that shaped the parks.

Hamilton & The NY Manumission Society

2/8 & 2/22, 2:30-3:30pm

Attend a presentation on Hamilton's New York Manumission Society, an organization instrumental in the abolition of slavery in New York.

Site Tours

WED-SUN, 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 4pm

Period Rooms and Exhibits

Other Activities

History, architecture, tours and picnicking (permit).